Skip to main content

How to ‘be a man’ living with bipolar – from relationships to dealing with male stereotypes

matt-looking-off-camera

What does it mean to be an Aussie man living with bipolar and navigating relationships?

We ask Matt and Mark, two SANE Peer Ambassadors, about their experiences. They share how they deal with stigma, harmful stereotypes, and what they find helpful from the people close to them. At the end of the day, they say speaking up about their mental health (as hard as it can be) allows others to do the same.

Matt is passionate about the difference early intervention and education can make to a person's mental health recovery. Mark has come from a background playing with the AFL to being an advocate for Victorians experiencing addiction and mental health issues.

Read more >>
Rate this blog:
0

Dating with bipolar disorder

dov-smiling-at-camera-850

Vulnerability, trust and authenticity are the foundations of any successful relationship. It takes time to really get to know someone and build genuine intimacy. In the initial phases of dating, everyone tries to put their best foot forward to impress their prospective partner.

The ‘honeymoon’ phase is ideally full of fun, laughter and good times as we enjoy spending time getting to know the other person. The reality is that we all have our challenges and flaws which will rear their heads when life becomes stressful or we have our first conflict with our loved one.

While I do not see bipolar disorder as a ‘con’ for a relationship, it does bring its own unique set of challenges, all of which can be overcome.

Read more >>
Rate this blog:
2

What you need to know about relapse in bipolar disorder

david-marcu-unsplash-1700x115_20180913-042550_1 Bipolar affects more people than you think.

Bipolar disorder causes people to experience intense mood swings – from manic highs to depressive lows. Not everyone experiences bipolar the same way, however, it is estimated that at least 75 per cent of people diagnosed with bipolar disorder will relapse, even when following a treatment plan. 

In bipolar disorder, a relapse is defined as the return of depression or a manic or hypomanic episode after a period of wellness. Sometimes it is possible to predict a relapse; often it is not. For many, the onset of a relapse seems to come out of the blue.

Read more >>
Rate this blog:
24

Five things people get wrong about bipolar disorder

stop-wrong

Bipolar disorder involves periods of manic highs and depressive lows. No two people are the same and experiences ­– the length and intensity of the highs and the presence of depression – differ from person to person.

Bipolar affects more people than you think. As many as one in 50 people will experience it at some stage in their life. Yet, despite this prevalence it's common for people to make inaccurate assumptions about the disorder.

Read more >>
Rate this blog:
25

Can exercise help manage symptoms of bipolar disorder?

spin-class-unsplash-850x575

Physical health is important for people living with a mental illness. Not only does it help reduce the risk of physical illness, it's also a good way to engage with others, get out in to the community and get the endorphins pumping.

SANE Peer Ambassador Ceris is a passionate advocate for using exercise as a way to help manage mental health symptoms, so we asked her 'can exercise be a form of medicine?'.

Read more >>
Rate this blog:
1

Don’t ask me what’s wrong – ask me what happened

Maree-baw-850x575

I'm an artist, speaker, writer, teacher, wife, mum and founder of The Heartworks Creative.

I use every one of my bipolar brain cells, experiences and talents to assist and empower others on their own personal mental health recovery journey.

Read more >>
Rate this blog:
8

What’s the difference between bipolar I and II?

What’s the difference between bipolar I and II?

On first impression bipolar disorder is easy to understand. It’s a disorder where a person experiences extreme mood changes, highs and lows, with periods of normality in between.

But, when we look further into the disorder, or we hear people talk about their experiences, it starts to get a little more complex, and the terms bipolar I and bipolar II emerge.

Read more >>
Rate this blog:
11

Self-care for managing mania

Self-care for managing mania

Mania and hypomania are symptoms of bipolar disorder. Mania is the ‘high’ euphoric end of the mood scale, with hypomania similar but with less intensity.

If you think you’re experiencing mania, or symptoms are coming on, these strategies may help prevent or reduce the severity of an episode.

Read more >>
Rate this blog:
17

My story: Bipolar disorder and self-care

My story: Bipolar disorder and self-care

I have Bipolar Disorder Type 1 and my husband has Bipolar Disorder Type 2. We’ve been married for 12 years and call ourselves Mr and Mrs Bipolar, in an affectionate way. But it's not always been an easy way. Not by a long shot.

It is so easy to disassociate, not only from each other, but from ourselves when things 'get too hard'. For me, I need more to live beyond 'just coping'. I want to thrive, rather than just survive. But on the bad days I'll settle with survive!

Read more >>
Rate this blog:
3

Busting the myths about Bipolar disorder

matt-dale-peer-ambassador

There are lots of myths about Bipolar disorder. Unfortunately many invite stigma towards people living with Bipolar, potentially limiting the support, understanding and treatment they receive.

Because of this it’s important to know the facts. Here’s a few of the most common myths about Bipolar disorder.

Read more >>
Rate this blog:
9

Popular blogs

Follow the blog