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This is what depression looks like

This is what depression looks like

Depression is not feeling down for an hour out of your day. It's not something to be glorified. It's not beautiful.

Depression is being on the brink of tears because you dropped your glass of water. It’s not having the urge to clean up the mess, rather you fall on the floor and cry.

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Staying safe while supporting peers

Staying safe while supporting peers

Peer support is a form of mental health care that’s growing in popularity.

Benefits include reduced isolation, empowerment, collaborative learning and connections with people who’ve had similar experiences. Some people say the relaxed environment helps them express issues they would struggle to share in a formal setting.

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How to build a community that's safe for LGBTI people

How to build a community that's safe for LGBTI people

Did you know that people of a diverse sexual orientation, sex or gender account for up to 11 per cent of the Australian population? Yet, according to the Human Rights Commission up to 42 per cent of LGBTI people have hidden who they are at a community event.

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Osher: 'It’s been nearly three years since I lost my mind'

Osher looking into camera and smiling

It’s been nearly three years since I lost my mind.

I had told people in the past that I’d lost my mind, but I didn’t know what I was talking about.

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Three reasons to be optimistic about schizophrenia

Three reasons to be optimistic about schizophrenia

Despite what many people think, schizophrenia is far from being a life sentence. Recovery, to a lesser or greater degree, is possible.

A 2010 national survey found that 54.8% of participants who had experienced multiple episodes of psychosis went on to achieve partial or good recovery between episodes.

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Lived experience tips for managing schizophrenia

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The symptoms and effects of schizophrenia are as unique and varied as the people who experience the illness. 

Likewise the way people manage their symptoms – including treatment methods, medication and self-care strategies – differ from person to person. The strategies implemented can also change throughout someone's life.

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How to manage conflict

How to manage conflict

Conflict or disagreement is a part of life and something everyone experiences. Yet, we all respond to and resolve conflict in our own unique way.

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What’s the difference between bipolar I and II?

What’s the difference between bipolar I and II?

On first impression bipolar disorder is easy to understand. It’s a disorder where a person experiences extreme mood changes, highs and lows, with periods of normality in between.

But, when we look further into the disorder, or we hear people talk about their experiences, it starts to get a little more complex, and the terms bipolar I and bipolar II emerge.

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Self-care for managing mania

Self-care for managing mania

Mania and hypomania are symptoms of bipolar disorder. Mania is the ‘high’ euphoric end of the mood scale, with hypomania similar but with less intensity.

If you think you’re experiencing mania, or symptoms are coming on, these strategies may help prevent or reduce the severity of an episode.

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17

Is narcissism common? The answer may surprise you

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It’s common to label people considered self-centred or egotistical as a narcissist. But what exactly is narcissism? How common is narcissism? And how do we know when someone is living with narcissistic personality disorder (NPD)?

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