Skip to main content

The reality of stigma surrounding mental health issues – Q&A with Jenni.

qanda-jenni-stigmawatch

Meet Jenni.

The reality of stigma surrounding mental health issues – Q&A with Jenni.

Jenni is a creative, positive person who believes that “the glass is always half full.” She enjoys sharing her mental health journey with professionals, carers, the general public and with others who have a lived experience of mental health issues.


Jenni is a SANE Australia Peer Ambassador. She has lived with a diagnosis of schizo-affective disorder for over 20 years. Schizo-affective disorder is a mental health condition marked by a combination of schizophrenia symptoms, such as hallucinations or delusions and mood disorder symptoms, such as depression or mania.

In this Q&A guest blog, Jenni shares some of her experiences about the everyday impact of stigma surrounding mental health issues and why she feels so strongly about changing attitudes and educating others about complex mental health issues.

Read more >>
Rate this blog:
0

Explaining the voices in my head

Amos-Bar-Zeev-unsplash

I think I should feel fortunate when it comes to hearing voices. While I have the ever-curdling mixture of psychosis in the background of my thoughts, the voices I hear are still my own. 

It is still my own internal dialogue. It's just that most of the time, it's not there to help me.

Read more >>
Rate this blog:
13

My story: Managing the ups and downs

walking-field-850x575

It's not only the mood swings, delusions and hallucinations that Sarah has had to fight in her 15 year battle with schizoaffective disorder, she's also had to tackle stigma, misunderstanding and negative reactions.

She discusses how she's learnt to live with the symptoms and the public perception.

Read more >>
Rate this blog:
8

Common questions about schizoaffective disorder

schizoaffective-850x575

Schizoaffective disorder is a psychiatric condition, combining the symptoms of schizophrenia and mood disorders (bipolar or depression). These symptoms – hallucinations, delusions, psychosis and episodes of mania or depression – can occur together or at different times.

Read more >>
Rate this blog:
13

Self-help when hearing voices

blog-hearing-voices-flicrk-fotogruen-850x575

Hearing voices can be an intrusive and distressing experience for people living with a psychotic illness.

Developing personalised interventions and strategies, preferably with health professionals, can help alleviate the impact.

This may be achieved by focusing on a specific problem, such as voices that wake you at night, or focusing on an element, like a particularly distressing voice.

Read more >>
Rate this blog:
23

Lived experience tips for managing schizophrenia

Lived experience tips for managing schizophrenia

The symptoms and effects of schizophrenia are as unique and varied as the people who experience the illness. 

Likewise the way people manage their symptoms – including treatment methods, medication and self-care strategies – differ from person to person. The strategies implemented can also change throughout someone's life.

Read more >>
Rate this blog:
10

A journey to discover holistic, family-centred care for psychosis

A journey to discover holistic, family-centred care for psychosis

London, Barcelona, Stockholm, Gothenburg and Geneva. It sounds like the running sheet from a music tour, but it’s the itinerary of Lisa Sweeney’s upcoming mental health research trip as part of the SANE Community Award.

Read more >>
Rate this blog:
2

Top picks: Exploring schizophrenia

Top picks: Exploring schizophrenia

For Schziophrenia Awareness Week we've put together a list of resources that explore issues relating to schizophrenia.

Read more >>
Rate this blog:
0

Madness, poetry and the search for meaning

Madness, poetry and the search for meaning

I was a young twenty-three year old graduate when I was diagnosed with schizophrenia in 1976. I was told by clinicians that with every psychotic episode I had, I would go further into unreachable madness from which I would never recover.

The diagnosis was a death-sentence. Any thoughts of a future and a career were crushed by this awful mental illness and an equally awful assumption that my life would amount to nothing.

There was no presumption of capacity, no expectation that I would blossom like my friends around me who were getting on with their lives and forging successful careers. I felt irrelavant, and worse, invisible in the world. I describe it as walking in the shadows of others and casting none of my own. I was left with no identity, no sense of self and no hope. They were dark days.

Read more >>
Rate this blog:
4

The 80:20 rule

The 80:20 rule

When people think of recovery from an episode of illness – whether physical or mental – they often think solely in terms of hospitals, doctors and nurses.

Clinical care is essential of course, but it’s not the whole story, as David, explains . . .

Read more >>
Rate this blog:
10

Popular blogs

Follow the blog