Skip to main content

What's in a name? Carer, supporter or something else?

family-pixabay-850x575

'I never considered myself to be a carer until another parent of a young person with a mental illness told me that I was eligible for a carer's allowance.

'At that moment I realised that what I was doing for my son was beyond normal mothering. Despite not pursuing the carer's allowance, I felt good about the fact that my efforts were worthy of recognition.'

Read more >>
Rate this blog:
9

Navigating the system

australia-geography-850x575

As a mother and carer of a son with mental illness, I've spent years traversing the system seeking care and support.

Over the years I've tackled education, health care, family and community services, human resources and at times the legal system.

Read more >>
Rate this blog:
4

Worrying when away from a loved one

carer-worry-anxiety0850x575

Supporting someone living with a mental illness can be a stressful experience. And it certainly doesn't come with an instruction manual.

For some carers, supporting someone means endless internal dialogue about the health and wellbeing of their loved one. Did they take their medication? Are they out of bed? Have they eaten? Showered? Where are they right now?

Read more >>
Rate this blog:
7

My story: The glue that holds it all together

mother-duck-850x575-Flickrv2

Carer . . . You may think this term implies solely supporting one person, but carers are also connected to a larger family dynamic. As such, carers often find themselves embroiled in complex situations.

We're frequently stomping out fires - in a state of perpetual conflict resolution - in order to keep the family stable and maintain a healthy equilibrium for all.

Read more >>
Rate this blog:
6

Caring for a spouse with BPD

CathyFred-850x575

Fred and Cathy live in regional Victoria. Cathy has borderline personality disorder, and is supported by her husband Fred.

Read more >>
Rate this blog:
12

The shift: from aspirations to managing what is

Managing-What-Is-blog-image-pexels-850x575

When my son first displayed symptoms I felt a desperate need to try and help him. 

Part of that need was born out of my own feelings of guilt. The remainder was fuelled my desire to alleviate his psychological pain.

Over the course of my son's diagnosis, there has been a huge shift in me. Initially I could not accept that nothing would help . I embarked upon a frenetic search for that illusive fix. I thought, 'Where did I go wrong? Why can't anyone help him?'

Read more >>
Rate this blog:
9

Protecting a relationship when caring for someone

couple-850x575

When a loved one is diagnosed with a mental illness, the automatic concern is for their wellbeing, treatment and recovery. This is a normal and natural response.

Yet many people fail to realise the process can change the family dynamic. Schedules and priorities may change, with time required for appointments, treatment and support. 

Read more >>
Rate this blog:
5

Staying safe while supporting peers

Staying safe while supporting peers

Peer support is a form of mental health care that’s growing in popularity.

Benefits include reduced isolation, empowerment, collaborative learning and connections with people who’ve had similar experiences. Some people say the relaxed environment helps them express issues they would struggle to share in a formal setting.

Read more >>
Rate this blog:
3

Carer insight: Living with and loving someone with BPD

Carer insight: Living with and loving someone with BPD

A common call to the SANE Helpline often goes like this:

‘I think my partner, daughter or son has borderline personality disorder (BPD) and I feel like I have to walk on eggshells around them. I love this person, but the situation can be so hurtful. How can I stay and support them, but protect myself as well?’

To help we asked one of our carers, 'Ace', to share his advice for living with and loving someone with BPD. We also asked SANE Help Centre Manager, Suzanne Leckie, to add SANE’s perspective on best practice for carers.

Read more >>
Rate this blog:
0

Boundary-setting and mental illness

Boundary-setting and mental illness

Boundary setting is an important, albeit difficult, part of self-care when a loved one is living with a mental illness. This may be harder and more complex for some than others. By setting boundaries, you are taking responsibility for how others treat you and your own needs seriously.

Read more >>
Rate this blog:
11

Popular blogs

Follow the blog